Short-cut politics could result in the country’s short-circuit: PM Modi



Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday warned against “short-cut politics” based on populist measures, which he said could lead to a country’s short-circuit.

Addressing a BJP rally here after the inauguration and laying of foundations of projects worth more than Rs 16,800 crore, the PM said there was no alternative for hard work and those indulging in short-cut politics could not. of such projects.

Modi also said that India is a land of faith and spirituality, and the journeys have shaped us as a better society and nation, as he spoke at the public meeting, held before the auspicious Shravani Mela ’.

“The government is making investments to provide modern infrastructure in areas associated with faith, spirituality and historical importance,” he said, referring to the Ayodhya, Kashi Vishawnath and Baba Baidyanath temples here.

Urging people to stay away from politics based on populist measures, Modi said it was a challenge in front of the country.

“The country faces a big challenge of short-cut politics, but it’s a big fact that the country on which politics is based can have a short-circuit … It can destroy a country,” he said. said Modi.

“It is very easy to get votes from the people by taking populist measures, adopting short-cut politics without thinking of far-reaching consequences, the PM said.

Emphasizing that the countrymen need to take India to newer heights as it approaches 100 years of Independence, Modi said it can be achieved through hard work alone.

He said those who practice short-cut politics will not try to build model airports, new highways and medical colleges in different districts.

Discussing the projects he announced, Modi said his government ensures at the Center that it inaugurates those projects where the stone foundations it has laid.

This is the BJP’s management model, he asserted.

Earlier, projects were announced by a dispensation, stone foundations were laid by successive governments, and finally those who saw the light of day after several regimes.

(Only the headline and image of this report can be reproduced by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is automatically generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear reader,

Business Standard always strives hard to provide timely information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have broader political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and ongoing feedback on how to improve our offer has only reinforced our determination and commitment to these goals. Even in these difficult times coming up with Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, powerful insights and critical comments on topical related issues. .
We, however, have a request.

As we combat the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you better quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscriptions to our online content will only help us achieve the goals of offering you better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions will help us perform the journalism for which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor